Here are the first Images of Earth sent by INSAT-3DR. INSAT-3DR is an advanced meteorological satellite of India configured with an imaging System and an Atmospheric Sounder, launched by ISRO (Indian Space Research Organization)  on August 28, 2016 insat-3dr_vis_first-imageThe Moon is also seen at the bottom of image.

The visible band/spectrum is the portion of the electromagnetic spectrum that is visible to the human eyeElectromagnetic radiation in this range of wavelengths is called visible light or simply light. A typical human eye will respond to wavelengths from about 390 to 700 nm. In terms of frequency, this corresponds to a band in the vicinity of 430–770 THz.

The spectrum does not, however, contain all the colors that the human eyes and brain can distinguish. Unsaturated colors such as pink, or purplevariations such as magenta, are absent, for example, because they can be made only by a mix of multiple wavelengths. Colors containing only one wavelength are also called pure colors or spectral colors.

insat-3dr_swir_first-image

Short-wave infrared (SWIR) light is typically defined as light in the 0.9 – 1.7μm wavelength range, but can also be classified from 0.7 – 2.5μm. Since silicon sensors have an upper limit of approximately 1.0μm, SWIR imaging requires unique opticaland electronic components capable of performing in the specific SWIR range.

SWIR is similar to visible light in that photons are reflected or absorbed by an object, providing the strong contrast needed for high resolution imaging. Ambient star light and background radiance (nightglow) are natural emitters of SWIR and provide excellent illumination for outdoor, nighttime imaging.

Source: ISRO

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